JDS Track the topics, authors and articles important to you
HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
QUICK SEARCH:   [advanced]
Author:
Keyword(s):
Year:  Vol:  Page: 


Reprint (PDF) Version of this Article
Similar articles found in:
JDS Online
PubMed
PubMed Citation
This Article has been cited by:
other online articles
Search PubMed for articles by:
Schutz, M. M.
Alert me when:
new articles cite this article
Download to Citation Manager

Journal of Dairy Science, Vol 77, Issue 7 2113-2129, Copyright 1994 by American Dairy Science Association


JOURNAL ARTICLE

Genetic evaluation of somatic cell scores for United States dairy cattle

M. M. Schutz
Animal Improvement Programs Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Beltsville, MD 20705-2350.

Increases in milk yield from genetic selection may be accompanied by correlated increases in genetic susceptibility to clinical mastitis and somatic cells. Unlike clinical mastitis, somatic cell scores can be easily determined and recorded and are related to milk loss from subclinical mastitis. Selection against high somatic cell scores should decrease incidence of clinical mastitis and provide direct economic benefits through higher milk quality premiums. Genetic evaluation for lactation means of linear somatic cell scores has been implemented by USDA and parallels that for yield traits. Because additive genetics accounts for only about 10% of differences in somatic cell scores among cows, more information is needed for the same degree of confidence in genetic estimates as for yield. Only 80% of DHIA cows currently have somatic cell records. Thus, reliabilities of somatic cell evaluations are smaller than those for yield traits. Most progress in selection for lower somatic cell scores will come through sires of cows considered as bull dams. Somatic cell evaluations may best be reported through an economic index with a small amount of emphasis on somatic cell score relative to yield traits. Greater emphasis on somatic cell scores would decrease genetic gain in yield traits, which are economically more important.

This article has been cited by other articles:


Home page
J Dairy SciHome page
G. M. Wood, P. J. Boettcher, J. Jamrozik, G. B. Jansen, and D. F. Kelton
Estimation of Genetic Parameters for Concentrations of Milk Urea Nitrogen
J Dairy Sci, July 1, 2003; 86(7): 2462 - 2469.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Physiol. GenomicsHome page
D. W. HEYEN, J. I. WELLER, M. RON, M. BAND, J. E. BEEVER, E. FELDMESSER, Y. DA, G. R. WIGGANS, P. M. VANRADEN, and H. A. LEWIN
A genome scan for QTL influencing milk production and health traits in dairy cattle
Physiol Genomics, January 21, 2000; 1(3): 165 - 175.
[Abstract] [Full Text]


Home page
GeneticsHome page
Q. Zhang, D. Boichard, I. Hoeschele, C. Ernst, A. Eggen, B. Murkve, M. Pfister-Genskow, L. A. Witte, F. E. Grignola, P. Uimari, G. Thaller, and M. D. Bishop
Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci for Milk Production and Health of Dairy Cattle in a Large Outbred Pedigree
Genetics, August 1, 1998; 149(4): 1959 - 1973.
[Abstract] [Full Text]





HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
Copyright 1994 by the American Dairy Science Association.